In China’s strange bull market, most stocks are retreating

Investors look at an electronic board showing stock information on the first trading day after the New Year holiday at a brokerage house in Shanghai January 3, 2017. — Reuters pic Investors look at an electronic board showing stock information on the first trading day after the New Year holiday at a brokerage house in Shanghai 3, 2017. — Reuters pic SHANGHAI, Dec 7 — Every bull market is unique, but the one in right now looks downright strange.

The Shanghai Composite Index has climbed 24 per cent from its January 2016 low, and yet a majority of stocks in the benchmark gauge have fallen during the period.

That’s a first for Shanghai bull markets since at least 2002, when Bloomberg began tracking the data. And it makes China a big global outlier.

For all 45 of the other national equity gauges that have climbed at least 20 per cent since last January, a majority of index members have recorded gains. Even in the US, where some investors have bemoaned the S&P 500 Index’s reliance on a handful of surging tech shares, the ratio of advancers versus decliners is more than 5-to-1.



So what’s going on in Shanghai? In short, the market’s biggest companies are outperforming by an unusual degree — propping up the benchmark gauge even as 724 of its 1,427 members post declines.

The divergence has been driven partly by wagers that China’s largest companies are best positioned to weather slowing economic growth and rising borrowing costs.

But analysts say state intervention may also be playing a role. Equity purchases by government-linked funds helped fuel the market’s recovery from a US$5 trillion (RM20.3 trillion) crash in late 2015, and the so-called National Team is thought to have been stabilizing share prices ever since.

State funds get the most bang for their buck by purchasing index heavyweights like Industrial & Commercial Bank of China Ltd, the nation’s biggest lender and the top contributor to the Shanghai Composite’s bull-market gain.

For Hao Hong, the Bocom International Holdings Co strategist who predicted both the start and peak of China’s 2015 equity boom, this year’s lack of market breadth is a “very, very bearish signal.”

He expects the Shanghai Composite, which declined 0.5 per cent to 3,279.02 at 10.44am local time, to trade near or below the 3,300 level for most of next year as expensive large-cap shares begin to lose their appeal. — Bloomberg

Source: The Malay Mail Online








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